Monthly Archives: July 2018

All about sink overflow holes!

Stinky sink? Many times my clients complain of a constant, persistent foul odor in their bathroom that’s reminiscent of a “wadded up wet towel left in the bottom of the hamper for a week or two!” Oh, no…

Most all lavatory sinks have what’s called an “overflow” hole. By design it allows water to flow down the drain – in the event the sink were to fill too high – and not over the top & onto the floor. Unless of course, the drain is plugged or slow draining – but that’s an entirely different story. The image below is a common bathroom sink with the overflow in the back of the sink. Some sinks have the overflow hole in the front of the sink – same thing, just different design. Often this overflow area can collect foul mildew smelling bacteria. Simply flood the overflow hole with plain white vinegar to kill the bacteria. Use a funnel, or perhaps simply cup your hand as to divert the Vinegar into the hole or just let it glug out of the bottle into the hole. Nothing fancy – remember plain white vinegar is cheap and it’s hard to use too much.  Repeat as needed!

Ti Sutherland, Master Plumber – Sutherland Plumbing, LLCSink Overflow Hole

 

Sutherland Plumbing is Now Hiring!

Sutherland Plumbing is now accepting applications for a residential service & repair Journeyman Plumber and also an apprentice Plumber’s Laborer/Helper. Click HERE to go straight to the job application page on our website.

Do you know somebody who may be a candidate? Please feel free to share this post!

Sutherland Plumbing LLC: CCB# 200460

Sutherland Plumbing’s Sean Anderson Gets Rave Reviews!

Here at Sutherland Plumbing, there’s nothing better than when our customers show their appreciation & thanks for our awesome employees and their quality workmanship. Here’s three reviews for our man Sean Anderson that came in just one week!

July 21st 2018

“Great first experience with Sutherland Plumbing! Our upstairs shower was leaking into our kitchen cupboards and sliding door frame. With guests expected in a few weeks, we were anxious to learn what was causing the leak and have it fixed as soon as possible.

Sean Anderson came to assess the issue and provided a clear & concise explanation as to what the cause was in addition to explaining how he would fix the problem. After the work was completed, Sean ensured the shower was no longer leaking, provided an excellent overview of the work he did and also pointed out a high water pressure situation that needs attending to.

We’ll definitely have Sean come back for the additional work that needs to be done. We’re very satisfied with Sutherland Plumbing and highly recommend Sean!”

5 Stars (Yelp)

Janet B – Tualatin, OR

***

July 19th 2018 

“This is the second time I’ve used Sutherland Plumbing and I’ve had a very good experience both times. More recently, I had a leak in my toilet and Sean came to fix it. He called before coming to give me an ETA. Sean arrived when he said he would and diagnosed the problem quickly. He showed me what was needed and discussed my options. I decided to install a new toilet rather than fix the old one. We discussed what would meet my needs best and the toilet was installed the same day.

Sean is professional, helpful, friendly and does an outstanding job. I highly recommend Sutherland Plumbing and will not consider using any other plumber!”

5 Stars (Yelp)

Michelle I – Portland, OR

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July 18th 2018

“I specifically asked for Sean from Sutherland Plumbing to come to our house for a second, unrelated plumbing leak that just arose. I was equally satisfied this time around with his knowledge, patience, insight and pressure-free approach. I whole-heartedly recommend Sutherland Plumbing and plan to call them for any issues I may have in the future.”

5 Stars (Yelp)

Benoit D – San Francisco, CA & Portland, OR

Sutherland Plumbing is Now Hiring!

Sutherland Plumbing is now accepting applications for a residential service & repair Journeyman Plumber and also an apprentice Plumber’s Laborer/Helper. Click HERE to go straight to the job application page on our website.

Do you know somebody who may be a candidate? Please feel free to share this post!

How to shut-off the main water supply to your home!

“Do you know how, or more importantly where to shut-off the main water supply to your home?”

After 20 years it still surprises me that many (in fact most) clients don’t know how to go about turning-off the main water supply to their homes!

Every home should have a readily accessible, functional main water shut-off valve. The fact is, many times the valve is concealed, not easily accessible, non-functional, all of the above or missing altogether!  Regardless, here’s a pretty sure-fire way and backup plan to get your water shut-off quickly in the event of an emergency:

1) Locate and know where your water meter is located, typically you can find it near the curb or sidewalk in front of your house.Shut-off valve closed2) Open the lid to look inside.  Not all lids are the same.  Sometimes it’s necessary to remove the entire cover to see the meter or to access the shut off valve inside.Shut-off valve open3) There are a couple of ways to turn the valve.  Ultimately you’re trying to line up the two circles, about a 1/2 turn clockwise. There’s a tool made that goes by a few different names, the most common of which is “Meter Key” sold at just about every home center and hardware store.  Expect to pay somewhere between $10.00 – $30.00Meter Key4) You might have some hand tools laying around that may work in a pinch.  Namely a crescent wrench and something long, narrow & ridged like a screwdriver. See the illustration below on how to use these common hand tools to do the job in place of a “Meter Key.”Hand ToolsIt would do you well to familiarize yourself with the “how to” described here.

I can usually tell if a client has lived through a plumbing emergency or catastrophe by their knowledge of where & how to turn-off the main water supply.  One family I met recently had a bright red meter key conspicuously hanging on two nails in the garage.  My client told me about a nightmare experience they had in the past, wherein a toilet supply line had ruptured and nobody knew the first thing about getting the water shut-off!  The water line leaked several hundred, maybe thousands of gallons of water into the house before the water was shut-off by a responding emergency plumber.  Besides the expense of the emergency service call, they now faced not only the repair of the broken toilet line (the least of their worries), but thousands of dollars in restoration repairs and a hefty insurance claim.  The client went on to say that now everyone who lives in the house (including their 7 year-old) knows what the meter key is and how & when to use it!

Ti Sutherland – Master Plumber, Sutherland Plumbing.

Ti’s Tips Reminder – Oh no, Clogged Drains!

Hi Everyone!

I’m Ti Sutherland, Co-Owner & Master Plumber for Sutherland Plumbing in Portland, Oregon.  Here at Sutherland Plumbing, we strive to be the Portland Metro area’s #1 family-owned plumbing service.  But that’s not all – at Sutherland Plumbing we understand the importance for our customers to keep their plumbing systems running smoothly and efficiently all year-round.

So it’s in the spirit of “shared knowledge” that I present a reminder from my column, “Ti’s Tips” :

Ti’s Tips Reminder – Oh no, Clogged Drains!

The use of so-called “liquid drain cleaners” or openers is discouraged! There is NO marvel of design in these products. Most are made of highly caustic acids that only serve to dissolve, eat and destroy anything in their path including your plumbing pipes. Some even go as far as to claim “safe for all pipes” even if the results from using these products are temporary at best. You be the judge.

Drains clog for the most part as a result of grease, fats, oils and other matter accumulating inside the pipe.  In order to CLEAN the drain one must scour the inside with proper equipment and knowledge.  This is commonly referred to as snaking or “rootering” the drain.  There is a big difference between “CLEANING” the drain as opposed to “OPENING” the drain.  Baking soda and vinegar?  Use at your own risk.  Those items work best when baking or cooking food and are wasted when poured down the drain!  Don’t say we didn’t warn you!Image